12 | Making Amends

How does a community recover from a tragedy that claims over two dozen lives? How do they even begin to pick up the pieces and make things right again? And when it’s all said and done, what can the rest of the world learn from the 300-year old mistakes of colonial New England village? The answers aren’t as easy as they might appear.

SOURCES

  1. Marilynne Roach, Six Women of Salem: The Untold Story of the Accused and Their Accusers in the Salem Witch Trials (Boston: Da Capo Press, 2013).
  2. Marilynne Roach, The Salem Witch Trials: A Day-by-Day Chronicle of a Community Under Siege (New York: Taylor Trade Publishing, 2004).
  3. Mary Beth Norton, In the Devil’s Snare: The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692 (New York: Vintage Books, 2002).
  4. Deborah Kelly Kloepfer, “Cotton Mather’s ‘Dora’: The Case History of Mercy Short,” Early American Literature 44.1 (2009) pp. 3–38.
  5. Janice Knight, “Telling It Slant: The Testimony of Mercy Short,” Early American Literature 37.1 (2002) pp. 39–69.
  6. Bernard Rosenthal ed., Records of the Salem Witch Hunt (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009).
  7. Sarah Rivett, “Our Salem, Our Selves,” William and Mary Quarterly 65.3 (2008), pp. 495–502.
  8. Paul Boyer and Stephen Nissenbaum, Salem Possessed: The Social Origins of Witchcraft (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1974).
  9. Richard Francis, Judge Sewall’s Apology: The Salem Witch Trials and the Forming of an American Conscience (New York: HarperCollins, 2015).
  10. Emerson Baker, A Storm of Witchcraft: The Salem Trials and the American Experience (New York: Oxford University Press, 2015).
  11. Stacy Schiff, The Witches: Suspicion, Betrayal, and Hysteria in 1692 Salem (New York: Little, Brown 2015).
  12. John McWilliams, New England’s Crises and Cultural Memory: Literature, Politics, History, Religion, 1620–1860 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004).
  13. “Slavery & The Massachusetts Courts,” Long Road to Justice: The African American Experience in the Massachusetts Courts, Massachusetts Historical Society, http://www.longroadtojustice.org/topics/slavery
  14. “The Selling of Joseph,” Long Road to Justice: The African American Experience in the Massachusetts Courts, Massachusetts Historical Society, http://www.longroadtojustice.org/topics/slavery/selling-joseph.php
  15. Nicholas P. Spanos and Jack Gottlieb, “Ergotism and the Salem Village Witch Trials,” Science, Vol. 194 (1976): 1390-1394.
  16. Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism (London: Verso Books, 1983).
  17. Gretchen Adams, The Specter of Salem: Remembering the Witch Trials in Nineteenth-century America (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010).
  18. Marilynne Roach, The Salem Witch Trials: A Day-by-Day Chronicle of a Community Under Siege (New York: Taylor Trade Publishing, 2004).
  19. Henry Louis Gates, Jr, “The ‘Black’ Witch of Salem?,” The Root, 4 April 2014, https://www.theroot.com/the-black-witch-of-salem-1790875290
  20. Elaine Breslaw, Tituba, Reluctant Witch of Salem: Devilish Indians and Puritan Fantasies (New York: New York University Press, 1996).
  21. Owen Davies, American Bewitched: The Story of Witchcraft after Salem (New York: Oxford University Press, 2013).
  22. Diane E. Foulds, Death in Salem: The Private Lives behind the 1692 Witch Hunt (Guildford, CT: Globe Pequot Press, 2010).
  23. David Goss, The Salem Witch Trials: A Reference Guide (Westport, CT: Greenwood 2008).