06 | Consequences

Until now, the daily flood of examinations had been a temporary fix while everyone waited for the new government to set up an official trial. For many, that trial would represent hope and conclusion. For some, however, it would extract a heavy, deadly price.

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SOURCES

  1. Diane E. Foulds, Death in Salem: The Private Lives behind the 1692 Witch Hunt (Guildford, CT: Globe Pequot Press, 2010).
  2. Duane Hamilton Hurd, History of Essex County, Massachusetts: With Biographical Sketches of Many of Its Pioneers and Prominent Men (Philadelphia, PA: J.W. Lewis & Co., 1888).
  3. Emerson Baker and James Kences, “Maine, Indian Land Speculation, and the Essex County Witchcraft Outbreak of 1692,” Maine History 40.3 (Fall 2001), pp. 159–189.
  4. Mary Beth Norton, In the Devil’s Snare: The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692 (New York: Vintage Books, 2002).
  5. Theodore B. Lewis, “Land Speculation and the Dudley Council of 1686,” The William and Mary Quarterly 31.2 (April 1974), pp. 255–272.
  6. Allan Greer, Property and Dispossession: Natives, Empires and Land in Early Modern North America (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2018).
  7. Marilynne Roach, Six Women of Salem: The Untold Story of the Accused and Their Accusers in the Salem Witch Trials (Boston: Da Capo Press, 2013).
  8. Bernard Rosenthal ed., Records of the Salem Witch Hunt (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009).
  9. Paul Boyer and Stephen Nissenbaum, Salem Possessed: The Social Origins of Witchcraft (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1974).
  10. Marilynne Roach, The Salem Witch Trials: A Day-by-Day Chronicle of a Community Under Siege (New York: Taylor Trade Publishing, 2004).
  11. Emerson Baker, A Storm of Witchcraft: The Salem Trials and the American Experience (New York: Oxford University Press, 2015).